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Black Obsidian by Victoria Quinn

When I first started this review, I wasn't really sure what I was going to write, but then as I started thinking about it, I really did not like the book. This is why:

It's your typical toned down erotica novel; it's a carbon copy of Fifty Shades, just with different names. I feel like it started out strong, but once Calloway starts falling for this girl who "won't understand his lifestyle," it went downhill fast.I am so sick of rich men using their means to track down this one girl. It's creepy. If some man did that to me, I'd be filing a restraining order, not crawling into bed with him.I am also sick of the man trying to control every aspect of the woman's life before they have signed a contract. Calloway, you are Rome's boyfriend, not her Dom; you can't buy her a house because her apartment was broken into. Again, restraining order, not bed. And even when there's a contract between a Dom and a sub, there are soft and hard limits, a…
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Glass Sword and King's Cage by Victoria Aveyard

I don't know what it is about the Red Queen series. I avoided the first book because too many people liked it and that was just a huge turn off for me. Finally, after my boss and niece twisted my arm, I read it and I loved it. Although Glass Sword was already out, I started the first few pages and decided that I didn't want to read it. When King's Cage was released in February, I finally read both of them back to back, and again, I was left wondering why I waited so long. Especially since I had to refresh myself with what happened in Red Queen.

Glass Sword picks up right where Red Queen left off. Mare has teamed up with the rebel forces, although she keeps them at arms length, as she does with everyone else, to save as many people as possible and to find others like her-red blood, silver ability.

There is obvious tension between Mare, Cal, and Kilorn as the whole love triangle plays out. I'm totally over love triangles. Either give me something super messy, like in He&…

Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut

I know Kurt Vonnegut is supposed to be a brilliant author with amazing ideas, but honestly, I had a hard time with this book. The premise intrigued me, but the further into the book I got, the more I just wanted it to be done with.


Cat's Cradle follows Jonah, who is writing a book on Dr. Felix Hoenikker, one of the fathers of the atomic bomb, and in his research, learns of a substance called Ice-Nine, a product that instantly freezes any water it comes into contact with, and is capable of destroying all life on Earth. Hoenikker's three children are in possession of the substance, however, they are located all over the place and not easy to pin down, and he spends his time travelling to different places, ending in San Lorenzo.

The whole end of the world plot was pretty boring in my opinion, and none of the characters stood out to me. In fact, it's been over a month since I read the book and I had to flip through it again to remind myself of the characters and plot. For as l…

What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty

I was pretty intrigued by What Alice Forgot when I read the synopsis. It has a lot going for it. One day Alice is happily married and expecting her first child, the next, she is 10 years older, is a mother of three, and is in the process of getting a divorce and is dating again. However, once I started working my way through the book, I was somewhat disappointed.

Pretty much, Alice is 39 and is at the gym getting her bike workout when she passes out, bangs her head, and forgets the last 10 years of her life and believes she is 29 again.

The book is told from a couple different points of view, which usually doesn't bother me, but one of the POV's is Alice's sister, Elisabeth, as she writes to her psychologist. You learn a little bit about what Alice has forgotten about the last 10 years, but it focuses on her dealing with infertility and the fact that she low-key kidnapped a baby the week before Alice lost her memory. But the build up to finding out about the kidnapping and…

1984 by George Orwell

This is my second time reading 1984. The first time was my senior year of high school for my term paper. At the time, I was in love with the book; I thought it was one of the greatest books ever written. When it was listed on my 100 Books to Read in a Lifetime list, I was excited to read it again. This time, I wasn't as impressed. The writing is great, the plot is strong, but it didn't hold the magic it did all that time ago.

Winston Smith works for the Ministry of Truth, Minitru in Oceania, "correcting" documents so that they reflect the "truth." He goes through his day without thinking about much, he doesn't have to; Big Brother does all of the thinking. But Winston has vague memories of his childhood, and stories that his mother told him, it hasn't always been this way, and occasionally, he thinks of that and wonders what is was like before everything was decided for them. When Winston meets Julia, he slowly begins to rebel. But Big Brother sees…

The Dwellers Saga and the Country Saga by David Estes

This series really caught me by surprise. I had bought the audio book on Audible because they had The Moon Dwellers, The Star Dwellers, and The Sun Dwellers all together in one bundle. I didn't think I was going to love it, but it had an interesting aspect to it. So, I started. About halfway through the first book, I realized this was something that had really piqued my interest, so I did some searching on Goodreads and saw that there was a fourth, The Earth Dwellers, that wasn't included in the bundle. Turns out, it combines the Dwellers Saga with another series, the Country Saga, and that you shouldn't read it until finishing the other six books. Well, now I had to finish all of it, and David Estes did not disappoint.

The People Who Live Under Ground
The Dwellers series starts out by explaining that a huge meteorite was coming towards the Earth and so the American people built a shelter beneath the surface of the Earth that eventually evolved into three realms: Star, Moon…

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

With all of the crazy going on in the world right now, it was really nice to read a book that is just positive. The Alchemist is filled with hope and dreams and makes you believe anything you set your mind to is achievable. But there is also a lot of simple truths in the book, making it full of life lessons.

The Alchemist follows the path of Santiago, who is a shepherd that dreams of travelling the world. That is one of the reasons he became a shepherd; they don't stay in one place and are always meeting new people. But after a chance meeting with a great king, Santiago finds out that he is so close to discovering his Personal Legend if he just travels to Egypt and finds the treasure. Going out on a limb, Santiago travels to Egypt, but this is just the start of his journey. As his search for his Personal Legend takes him to places he never dreamed of, we learn bits about the people who enter his life and how they influence his decisions, and how he influences theirs.

There are a lot…